Ssh key on multiple machines. privacy

Ssh key on multiple machines Rating: 8,8/10 262 reviews

How to set up an SSH key and use it for GitLab

ssh key on multiple machines

Then, when you create a new Droplet, you can choose to include that public key on the server. If you want to use the private key from another machine - you just copy it to that other machine. When generating a key, you can specify which name you want to use; so if you are dealing with multiple hosts, you might want to have a key for each in case one gets compromised. It's not clear to me that this is such a big deal that you'd make your users lives harder because of it. It will ignore unknown keys in the config not known to github at all and accepts the first known key in the chain.

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How to create ssh keys and manage multiple keys

ssh key on multiple machines

If you've already added keys, you'll see them on this page. The only time duplicating a private key is feasible is, for example, when you are migrating a server to new hardware while keeping the same software configuration. So, before imposing any kind of security requirement or security-related inconvenience on users, think very carefully. Should a passphrase-protected private key fall into an unauthorized users possession, they will be unable to log in to its associated accounts until they figure out the passphrase, buying the hacked user some extra time. Enter passphrase empty for no passphrase : It's up to you whether you want to use a passphrase.

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Sharing an SSH key between multiple users? : linuxadmin

ssh key on multiple machines

You can instruct ssh to try multiple keys in succession when connecting. Make sure you're adding it to the right account. Programs can then borrow the key from the key store, and use them as if it were a key with no passphrase. Surely it doesn't outbeat a per-server configuration as in other answers, but at least you won't have to add a configuration for all and every server you connect to! The easiest and the recommended way to copy your public key to the server is to use a utility called ssh-copy-id. Since the keypair does have a passphrase, it should be fairly secure, as long as my physical machines are secure, right? This will delete and replace any private key you had at H2. I wonder if I've broke something with it though. Though having the same key authorized for multiple machines does prove that the same key-holder has access to both machines from a forensic perspective.

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How to conveniently manage SSH keys across multiple machines

ssh key on multiple machines

PastaFeline, I would think the key difference see what I did there? Please try to only make helpful replies to questions. The more additional security you add, the more convenience you give up. If you don't see this message or it falls back to password prompt then the public key isn't working. So allow people to do either, presenting the easier and more user-friendly option front-and-center in tutorials or explanations, while leaving the door open or even explicitly mention support as a footnote or afterthought for users to practice multiple-keys-per-ssh-client workflows if they value the extra security. When the two match up, the system unlocks without the need for a password. I don't know if I'm missing something important in that statement. You can increase security even more by protecting the private key with a passphrase.

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Using SSH Keys — RACF

ssh key on multiple machines

You can potentially help others having the same problem! If you don't specify a password, then you essentially get passwordless logon to remote machines, and if you trust your file system enough, then you can effectively have a single-sign-on architecture. You can also create it using makecert. Load your private key into Pageant to automatically authenticate so that you don't need to enter your passphrase. Thanks for contributing an answer to Server Fault! If you do have a private key on a remote system, make sure that it is not the same key used to access the system. You will have a lot more keys to handle, but you will be less vulnerable if one gets compromised. But if it exists, it reuses the latest connection that created that file I'm not pretty sure how exactly works, but it's something like that.


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How to set up an SSH key and use it for GitLab

ssh key on multiple machines

Step Three—Copy the Public Key Once the key pair is generated, it's time to place the public key on the server that we want to use. By default, Git automatically performs compression when sending or retrieving data, but Mercurial doesn't. So I found a trick with github. Your public key can be shared with anyone, but only you or your local security infrastructure should possess your private key. I'd really like to not have to create another keypair to keep track of.

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key management

ssh key on multiple machines

For example: git clone bitbucket. Typically that's not an issue, but it's worth pointing out. The level of granularity is up to you. In fact, the server and client can refuse to talk to older versions. After successfully entering your pass phrase, you will be logged into the gateway. Had to do the same to get it working.

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Use SSH keys with Windows for Linux VMs

ssh key on multiple machines

Also you would only enter a passphrase if a given server is willing to accept the key. Furthermore, keys can be created and disposed of at will; so if there's a suspected case of key loss, it's trivial to disable that key and replace it with another. Therefore, imposing too many requirements or too much inconvenience can be counter-productive to security. The almost helped me all the way. This allows users A, B, and C to use the key without issue. Generating multiple keys is easy; just give it a different file name when you generate it either interactively, or using the -f keyname argument to ssh-keygen.


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